Behavior Interventions

Philosophy and Purpose


As outlined in the Strategic Plan adopted March 6, 2014, the Davis Joint Unified School District holds the following beliefs:
  • We believe that every human being is unique and has inherent value.
  • We believe that education is a fundamental right.
  • We believe we are connected and have responsibility to ourselves, one another, and the whole.
  • We believe that a community has responsibility for the well-being of its members.
  • We believe that trust is essential to healthy relationships.
  • We believe that diverse perspectives enrich our community.
  • We believe that every person deserves to be treated with respect.

As a result of these beliefs, DJUSD has adopted a restorative practice approach to discipline that concentrates on the needs of the entire school community. Rather than seeking to punish unwanted behavior, the objective of the restorative process is to help repair harm, build relationships and develop strategies to avoid future incidents. We understand that students will make mistakes. DJUSD is dedicated to helping our students learn from their mistakes so that all of our students can thrive and contribute in our society. 

DJUSD is committed to ensuring that school is a safe learning environment for every student. Beyond academics, school can be a place where students learn valuable life skills that will serve them well as adults and serve our society in beneficial ways. To that end, DJUSD takes a comprehensive approach to matters involving rights, responsibilities, discipline, and restoration.

There are two purposes for standards of student behavior in a school discipline plan: to promote learning and growth for students as they develop self-discipline, and to provide a caring and respectful environment for all.

In this context, teachers and administrators are legally considered “parent/guardians on location.” This defines the relationship between school staff and their students. Students are young people and it is expected that their behavior will sometimes test boundaries of school rules; therefore, it is age-appropriate for young people to behave in ways that are inappropriate for the school environment. We also recognize that all behaviors serve a function and have complex origins. This is an ongoing process that requires communication and support between students, staff, families, and the larger community.

Break in Relationships

School staff regard all students as their responsibility to teach, guide, and support. Thus, just as in a home with parents/guardians, all students at school deserve to be treated consistently with care, hope, and positive attitudes. Our goal in responding to harms to others or the community, including breaches of rules or policies, is to have students understand the effects and impacts of their actions, to be accountable for those actions, and to take the opportunity to make things as right as they can be. Clear and appropriate consequences are part of this effort by school staff to educate and to encourage positive, productive student behavior.

The rights of all students are part of this philosophy. All students deserve to be psychologically and physically safe at school. These rights also mean that students who are accused of wrongdoing have a right to be heard, treated respectfully, and to understand the process as the school staff determine the appropriate response.

Find out about how DJUSD uses Restorative Practices.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
The rights inherent in a democratic society are maintained only if each individual understands and assumes responsibility for his or her own behavior. Students have both rights and responsibilities.

Student Rights

  • To be safe
  • To be respected and treated with compassion regardless of actual or perceived characteristics of race or ethnicity, color, ancestry, nationality, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, religion, marital, pregnancy, or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, gender expression, or genetic information, or based on his/her association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics
  • To be respected and treated with compassion regardless of actual or perceived wrongdoing
  • To express opinions, ideas and feelings, without infringing on the rights of others
  • To be heard
  • To have their person and property respected (including during a search)
  • To be informed of school rules and procedures and what is expected of them as students
  • To have confidentiality
  • To be academically supported and challenged
  • To be treated in a restorative way
  • To learn and grow from incidents of conflict or harm

Students Responsibilities

  • To take advantage of the academic opportunities offered
  • To strive for high achievement
  • To support and participate in school activities
  • To be knowledgeable regarding student rights and responsibilities
  • To attend school regularly and punctually
  • To be knowledgeable of school rules and follow them
  • To respect private and school property
  • To be considerate and non-disruptive in all spaces on campus and on buses
  • To be dressed in compliance with the District dress code
  • To be considerate to students, teachers, and staff
  • To be respectful of all students, and staff regardless of actual or perceived characteristics of race or ethnicity, color, ancestry, nationality, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, religion, marital, pregnancy, or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, gender expression, or genetic information, or based on his/her association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics
  • To keep language and gestures respectful and free of profanity or obscenities
  • To not use/possess alcohol, tobacco, or drugs on school campuses or school events
  • To take responsibility for harm done and work to repair it to the extent possible
INTERVENTION PROCEDURES

At the beginning of the school year the principal or designee meets with students to review and discuss the importance of a positive school climate, the positive purposes of school discipline and restorative practices, and the importance of respectful and caring behavior. This may be accomplished through school assembly, visits to individual classrooms, and the school’s student handbook. The presentation includes an understanding of the school district’s restorative principles, the values of respecting each individual’s dignity, and of supporting healthy relationships. Students are provided examples of behaviors that support the school community’s goals and those that are non-supportive. The categories of disrespectful behaviors or offenses outlined in the attached table provide examples of which behaviors undermine a strong, respectful community.

When a more serious misbehavior or breach of community standards or relationships occurs, as listed in the “Guidelines for Responsive Discipline in Elementary/Secondary Schools”, the principal, teacher or designee conducts an investigation. The fact-finding process includes interviewing the students involved (both those who may have caused harm and those who may have been harmed.), student and adult witnesses, collecting written or physical evidence related to the incident, and reviewing the records of the involved students. This process includes review of past incidents and other relevant information about the students involved. 

In order to support students during the interview process, the principal or designee will assess the need for intervention and/or support from the student’s counselor, the prevention and crisis manager, the climate coordinator, case manager, or the school nurse. In order to maximize instructional time, students will remain in class until the principal or designee is ready to begin the interview. Students will be told the purpose of the interview and whether the Davis Police Department will be involved. In cases of more serious misbehaviors, parents/guardians of the involved students are notified about the incident, the fact-finding process, and any consequences their own student receives. The district’s commitment to student confidentiality, supported by Board Policy and State law, precludes parents/guardians from hearing the consequences that other students receive. 

Administrators will do all they can to prevent any further harm to victims, but there may still be times when students feel that the fact-finding process itself is a negative consequence to them. Acknowledging their feelings and being clear about the purpose of this process can help. For example, if student victims are interviewed during their recess or privilege time, they may feel that they are being punished. If the classroom seat of the innocent or aggrieved student is moved, that student may feel s/he is being punished and unfairly treated. Staff will support the recipient(s) of harm in understanding how the process, including staff actions, supports them..

Despite strong efforts, sometimes the fact-finding process cannot be conclusive. For example, students may report very different stories about the incident, and interviews of students may or may not be reliable or appropriate. However, this does not mean that elements of the situation cannot be addressed. A restorative approach means that the District will do all it can to understand who has been affected, how they have been affected and will do all that it can to make things as right as possible, given each particular circumstance.

DJUSD recognizes the harmful effects of bullying on student learning and school attendance and strives to provide safe school environments that protect students from physical and emotional harm. District employees shall establish student safety as a high priority and shall not tolerate bullying or harassment of any student for any reason. Allegations of harassment, bullying, hate crimes, or physical assaults, including the use of racial, gender or other identity-based slurs, are referred to the school administrator for investigation and response. The teacher, principal or designee will address the issues surrounding the incident with those involved and/or the class as appropriate. Restorative practices, anti-bias lessons, and book-talks using books that discuss pertinent issues, are examples of ways to address issues with students.

STUDENT EDUCATION

Our goal is that all students are given the support they need to expand and enrich their competency in interpersonal skills, decision-making, reasoning, problem-solving and good citizenship. By using a variety of means, students are taught self-control and a respectful regard for others. Strategies include classroom presentations of concepts that are infused through their normal curriculum program, large and small group discussions, and individualized support


The "Guidelines for Responsive Discipline" frequently refer to “counsel student”, which is a typical instructional element of all consequences. The principal/designee determines the degree and type of “counsel”. “Counsel” may include activities that successfully restore respectful relationships and/or conflict resolution/management work with the principal, counselor or psychologist. In some cases, it may be appropriate for students to participate in a staff or student-facilitated, face-to-face, restorative practice meeting. Such efforts intend to create better understanding and a positive relationship among the students. However, face-to-face mediation may not always be safe or appropriate in all situations. For example, when a student is persistently harassing others, a face-to-face session can reinforce the bullying behavior. In these types of situations, parent/guardians are consulted to determine whether a restorative meeting should occur.

SUSPENSION AND ALTERNATIVES TO SUSPENSION

The more clarity students have about what constitutes a breach of the community, relationships or rules, sometimes called misbehavior, and the more they understand that any misbehavior will be known and responded to in a timely way, the more likely it is that students will behave appropriately. Consistency in the application of a restorative approach to student development when they have been the cause or recipient of harm, and the taking of responsibility for the harm, is more likely to result in positive behaviors. Restorative practices will be used to help students understand the impact of their behavior on others and to provide education around the larger issues of acceptance within a diverse community.


Home suspension is a severe response that is only used when a student’s behavior endangers themselves or others or the community. It is a legal declaration that the student has lost, for a maximum of five school days, his/her right to remain on a school campus. Committing an offense that could, or has caused, serious harm to others, can lead to expulsion from the district.

California Education Code dictates that alternatives to home suspension will be exhausted before a student is removed from the school environment. Since the purpose of school is to educate, students need to remain in school and in the classroom as much as possible. Any listing of suspension as a possible consequence in the "Guidelines for Responsive Discipline" means that an alternative to suspension can be used instead of a home suspension.

GUIDELINES FOR RESPONSIVE DISCIPLINE IN ELEMENTARY

As with older students, our goal in responding to harms to others or the community, including breaches of relationships, rules, or policies, is to have students understand the effects and impacts of their actions, to be accountable for those actions, and to take the opportunity to make things as right as they can be.  Minor misbehaviors are handled at an immediate, informal level by the teacher, principal, or designee.  The following guidelines are the district’s formal set of progressive responses to serious or repeated misbehaviors.  In cases where the breach of harm is unusually severe, the administrator may move quickly to more serious consequences, always bearing in mind the particular situation of the student and their individual developmental, social and emotional state.  

​Level 1

Offense:

  • Name calling: personal attacks about family, body, intelligence, gender, etc.
  • Disruption of school or classroom activities: referred by teacher or staff member for behaviors that interfere with learning
  • Defiance of authority: ranges from breaking school rules to defiance directed at school staff
  • Disrespect of property (vandalizing or theft): school or private
  • Disrespect: foul language or obscene gestures
  • Physical roughness with no intent to hurt: rough play


Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses:

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • Loss of recess or related privileges/time
  • Contact/notify parent/guardian

Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • All day loss of social recesses OR related privileges/time out
  • Behavior contract or reflection writing
  • Removal from class
  • Contact or conference with parent/guardian


Level 2

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a Level 1 offense 1
  • Comments that insult or degrade a person because of his/her actual or perceived race, ethnic background, national origin, physical appearance, financial status, religion, age, sex, gender 2, gender identity, physical disability, mental disability, sexual orientation, family structure or association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics.(Always referred to office.)Such comments may include those made through an electronic device.
  • Harassment: Repeated unwelcome comments of a sexual nature
  • Threatening/Intimidation

Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • Loss of recess or time out
  • Contact or conference with parent/guardian

Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • Behavior contract or reflection writing
  • Removal from class
  • Suspension
  • Conference with parent/guardian


Level 3

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a Level 2 offense
  • Physical aggression with an intent to hurt: Push, hit, kick, strike with object (if causes injury or is directed at a staff member, could result in highest level of consequence) 3
  • Possessed/sold/furnished a dangerous object.

Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • K-3 students: lose recess/time out
  • 4-6 students: removal from class
  • Contact or conference with parent/guardian
  • Suspension


Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counsel student
  • Formal apology (verbal or written)
  • Behavior contract
  • K-3 students: Removal from class or suspension
  • 4-6 students: Suspension (single to multiple day)
  • Conference with parent/guardian
  • Suspension/Expulsion



Repeatedly committing an offense at any level may result in a consequence of a more serious nature. These increased consequences may be listed as part of the next level.

Gender is defined as “a person’s actual sex or perceived sex and includes a person’s perceived identity, appearance or behavior, whether or not that identity, appearance, or behavior is different from that traditionally associated with a person’s sex at birth.” {5CCR§ 4910 (K).}

Self-Defense: The student reasonably believed he/she was in imminent danger of bodily injury and immediate use of force was necessary to defend against that danger, the student used no more than reasonable force to defend against that danger, and there was no obvious opportunity to retreat.

GUIDELINES FOR RESPONSIVE DISCIPLINE IN SECONDARY

Our goal in responding to harms to others or the community, including breaches of relationships, rules, or policies, is to have students understand the effects and impacts of their actions, to be accountable for those actions, and to take the opportunity to make things as right as they can be.  Minor misbehaviors are handled at an immediate, informal level by the teacher, principal, or designee.  The following guidelines are the district’s formal set of progressive responses to serious or repeated misbehaviors.  In cases where the breach of harm is unusually severe, the administrator may move quickly to more serious consequences, always bearing in mind the particular situation of the student and their individual developmental, social and emotional state.

Level 1

Offenses: 

  • Failing to follow classroom procedures.
  • Cheating
  • Littering or spitting
  • Failure to follow school rules about the use of items such as bicycles, skateboard, any electronic device
  • Wearing clothes inappropriate for school (see Dress Code and Gang Policy 1)
  • Showing affection in a way inappropriate for school
  • Gambling
  • Misbehaving at a school sponsored activity
  • Behavior which a reasonable person would relieve insults and/or degrades a person 1
  • Rough play, fake fighting 2


Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Parent/guardian notification
  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Reflective writing/discussion
  • Written apology to staff, class, student, and /or parent/guardian
  • Detention


Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Conference with the parent/guardian
  • Face-to-face mediation if appropriate
  • Referral to community resources
  • Referral to counseling/training program
  • Loss of school activity/privileges
  • Suspension


Level 2

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a Level 1 offense 3
  • Being rude and argumentative to school staff
  • Using foul language or obscene hand gestures or symbols
  • Forgery of notes or signatures
  • Throwing food, water balloons, or other objects
  • Participation in unauthorized games, which could lead to personal injury or harm
  • Writing or drawing on school property


Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Parent/guardian notification
  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Reflective writing/discussion
  • Written apology to staff, class, student, and /or parent/guardian
  • Detention
  • Loss of school activity privileges
  • Assigned to an alternative correctional study program
  • Suspension


Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Conference with the parent/guardian
  • Face-to-face mediation if appropriate
  • Referral to community resources
  • Referral to counseling/training program
  • Loss of school activity/privileges
  • Suspension


Level 3

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a level 2 offense ¹
  • Behavior which a reasonable person or group would believe insults or degrades a person because of his/her physical appearance, financial status, or family structure (such as adoption, single parent, etc.) {E.C. 48900 (r); E.C. 48900.4}
  • Using intimidating or oppressive language or behavior {E.C. 48900.4}
  • Unauthorized use or possession of school/district forms
  • Plagiarism/Cheating
  • Possession or use of tobacco {E.C. 48900 (h)}
  • Habitual profanity or vulgarity {E.C. 48900 (i)}
  • Unauthorized photographing, audio and/or visual recording
  • Bullying, harassment by means of an electronic act directed to student or staff {E.C. 48900 (r)}
  • Lying by omission, commission, or prevarication
  • Pervasive, willful defiance of valid school authority {E.C. 48900 (k)}
  • Violating the District Gang Policy {BP/AR 5136}


Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Parent/guardian notification
  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Reflective writing/discussion
  • Written apology to staff, class, student, and /or parent/guardian
  • Detention
  • Loss of school activity privileges
  • Assigned to an alternative correctional study program
  • 1-3 days suspension for a first offense


Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Conference with the parent/guardian
  • Face-to-face mediation if appropriate
  • Referral to community resources
  • Referral to counseling/training program
  • Loss of school activity/privileges
  • 2-5 days suspension


1 Denotes that parent/guardian notification is required.
2 If harm occurs, higher consequences may be imposed.
3 Repeatedly committing an offense at any level may result in a consequence of a more serious nature. These increased consequences may be listed as part of the next level.


Offenses Against the Civil Rights of a Person

Violations in this level are inherently more serious than Level 3. The school administration generally enacts more serious consequences for violations in this level than a similar word or action might warrant in Level 3 when a person’s protected civil rights are not violated.


Level 4A

Offenses: 

  • Behavior which a reasonable person or group would believe insults or degrades a person because of his/her actual or perceived race, color, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, religion, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender 1, gender identity, gender expression, or association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics. {E.C. 48900 (r); E.C. 48900.4}


Consequences for 1st Time or Less Serious Offenses: 

  • Parent/guardian notification
  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Reflective writing/discussion
  • Written apology to staff, class, student, and /or parent/guardian
  • Detention
  • Loss of school activity privileges
  • Assigned to an alternative correctional study program
  • 1-3 days suspension for a first offense


Consequences for Serious or Repeated Offenses: 

  • Counseling by the student’s teacher, counselor, or an administrator
  • Conference with the parent/guardian
  • Face-to-face mediation if appropriate
  • Referral to community resources
  • Referral to counseling/training program
  • Loss of school activity/privileges
  • 2-5 days suspension


Level 4B

Offenses: 

  • Repeated violation of category 4A
  • Behavior which a reasonable person or group would believe intimidates, harasses, or threatens physical force of harm to a person because of his/her actual or perceived race, color, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, age, religion, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender 1, gender identity, gender expression, family structure, political beliefs, financial status, or association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics. Usually, this would include but not be limited to those words and behaviors from a person which demonstrates hostility toward the victim’s actual or perceived characteristics. {E.C. 48900 (k); E.C. 48900.4}


Mandatory Consequences:
These three consequences shall apply to any violation of Level 4 B.

  • Conference with parent/guardian, and
  • 2-5 days suspension or possible recommendation for expulsion if other means of correction have failed in the past due to the nature of the violation, the presence of the pupil causes a continuing danger to the physical safety of the pupil or others; and
  • Pupil is prohibited from attending all co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, practices, and contests beginning on the first day of suspension and continuing for a minimum of one week, but no more than nine weeks.A week is defined as seven consecutive calendar days.

Law enforcement may be notified.

These are the mandatory consequences for the listed behavior. The site administrator may lessen these consequences only for significant, extenuating circumstances. Justification shall be put in writing and forwarded to the superintendent within two days of the decision.

1 Gender is defined as “a person’s actual sex or perceived sex and includes a person’s perceived identity, appearance or behavior, whether or not that identity, appearance, or behavior is different from that traditionally associated with a person’s sex at Birth. [5 CCR § 4910 (k)]

Level 5

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a level 3 or 4 offense 1
  • Engaging in harassment, threats, or intimidation directed against a pupil or group of pupils {E.C. 48900 (r); E.C. 48900.4}
  • Sexual harassment {E.C. 48900.2}
  • Participating in initiation and hazing activities as defined in Board Policy and Penal Code 245.6(b) {E.C. 48900 (q)}
  • Willfully use force or violence upon the person of another, except in self defense {E.C. 48900 (a) (2)}
  • Starting or engaging in a fight {E.C. 48900 (a)}
  • Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another person {E.C. 48900 (a)}
  • Committing an obscene act {E.C. 48900 (i)}
  • Aiding or abetting the infliction or attempted infliction of physical injury to another person {E.C. 48900 (t)}
  • Vandalizing school property or private property {E.C. 48900 (f)}
  • Stealing or knowingly receiving stolen school or private property {E.C. 48900 (g)}
  • Possession of, using, furnishing, or being under the influence of any controlled substance {E.C. 48900 (c)}
  • Tampering with a fire alarm and/or participating in a bomb threat {E.C. 48900.7}
  • Making terrorist threats against school officials, school property, or both {E.C. 48900.7}
  • Possessing, offering, or arranging to sell any drug paraphernalia {E.C. 48900 (j)}

Mandatory Consequences: 

These three consequences shall apply to any violation of Level 5:

  • Conference with parent/guardian; and
  • 1-5 days suspension or possible recommendation for expulsion if other means of correction have failed in the past or due to the nature of the violation, the presence of the pupil causes a continuing danger to the physical safety of the pupil or others; and
  • Pupil is prohibited from attending all co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, practices, and contests beginning on the first day of suspension and continuing for a minimum of one week, but no more than nine weeks.A week is defined as seven consecutive calendar days.

Law enforcement may be notified.

These are the mandatory consequences for the listed behavior. The site administrator may lessen these consequences only for significant, extenuating circumstances. Justification shall be put in writing and forwarded to the superintendent within two days of the decision.


Repeatedly committing an offense at any level may result in a consequence of a more serious nature. These increased consequences may be listed as part of the next level.
Self Defense: The student reasonably believed he/she was in imminent danger of bodily injury and immediate use of force was necessary to defend against that danger. The student used no more than reasonable force to defend against that danger, and there was no obvious opportunity to retreat.

Level 6

Offenses: 

  • Repeatedly committing a Level 5 offense 1
  • Hate crimes 2 committed or attempted against a person or his/her property {Penal Code 422.6 and E.C. 48900.3}
  • Possession of any knife, explosive, or other dangerous object of no reasonable use to the student {E.C. 48915 (a) (2)}
  • Assault or battery, as defined by Section 240 and 242 of the Penal Code upon any school employee {E.C. 48915 (a) (5)}
  • Possession of an imitation firearm {E.C. 48900 (m)}
  • Causing serious physical injury to any person, except in self-defense 3 {E.C. 48915 (a) (1)}
  • Unlawful possession of any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 of Division 10 ofthe Health and Safety Code {E.C. 48915 (a) (3)} which may include prescription drugs
  • Unlawfully offering, arranging to sell, or selling the prescription drug SOMA {E.C. 48900 (p)}
  • Robbery or extortion {E.C. 48915 (a) (4)}

Mandatory Consequences: 

All consequences shall apply to any violation of Level 6

  • Conference with parent/guardian; and
  • 5 days suspension and recommendation for expulsion unless the principal or superintendent finds that expulsion is inappropriate due to the particular circumstance.Such circumstance(s) shall be put in writing and forwarded to the Superintendent within 2 days of the decision not to recommend expulsion.
  • Law enforcement will be notified.


IN COMPLIANCE WITH EDUCATION CODE 48915, THE FOLLOWING OFFENSES WILL RESULT IN 5 DAYS OF SUSPENSION, MANDATORY RECOMMENDATION FOR EXPULSION, MANDATORY EXPULSION AND THE NOTIFICATION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT.

Level 7

Offenses: 

  • Possession, selling or otherwise furnishing a firearm {E.C. 48915(c)(1)}
  • Brandishing a knife at another person {E.C. 48915(c)(2)}
  • Unlawfully selling a controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code {E.C. 48915(a)(3)}which includes prescription medications
  • Committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault or committing a sexual battery {E.C. 48915(c)(4)}
  • Possessing an explosive as defined in 18 USC 921 {E.C. 48915(c)(5)}


Repeatedly committing an offense at any level may result in a consequence of a more serious nature. These increased consequences may be listed as part of the next level.
Hate Crimes: A criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of one or more of the following actual or perceived characteristics of the victim: disability, gender, nationality, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or association with a person or group with one of more of these actual or perceived characteristics.
Self Defense: The student reasonably believed he/she was in imminent danger of bodily injury and immediate use of force was necessary to defend against that danger. The student used no more than reasonable force to defend against that danger, and there was no obvious opportunity to retreat.

Questions?  Please call the Student Support Services at (530) 757-5300 ext. 140